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Death in Venice

by Thomas Mann
Simon Callow

Audiobook

1 of 1 copy available

The world-famous masterpiece by Nobel laureate Thomas Mann here in a new translation by Michael Henry Heim.

Published on the eve of World War I, a decade after Buddenbrooks had established Thomas Mann as a literary celebrity, Death in Venice tells the story of Gustav von Aschenbach, a successful but aging writer who follows his wanderlust to Venice in search of spiritual fulfillment that instead leads to his erotic doom.

In the decaying city, besieged by an unnamed epidemic, he becomes obsessed with an exquisite Polish boy, Tadzio. "It is a story of the voluptuousness of doom," Mann wrote. "But the problem I had especially in mind was that of the artist's dignity."


Expand title description text
Publisher: HarperCollins
Edition: Unabridged

OverDrive Listen audiobook

  • ISBN: 9780060779054
  • File size: 90968 KB
  • Release date: June 22, 2004
  • Duration: 03:09:26

MP3 audiobook

  • ISBN: 9780060779054
  • File size: 90968 KB
  • Release date: June 22, 2005
  • Duration: 03:09:26
  • Number of parts: 3

1 of 1 copy available

Formats

OverDrive Listen audiobook
MP3 audiobook

subjects

Fiction Literature

Languages

English

The world-famous masterpiece by Nobel laureate Thomas Mann here in a new translation by Michael Henry Heim.

Published on the eve of World War I, a decade after Buddenbrooks had established Thomas Mann as a literary celebrity, Death in Venice tells the story of Gustav von Aschenbach, a successful but aging writer who follows his wanderlust to Venice in search of spiritual fulfillment that instead leads to his erotic doom.

In the decaying city, besieged by an unnamed epidemic, he becomes obsessed with an exquisite Polish boy, Tadzio. "It is a story of the voluptuousness of doom," Mann wrote. "But the problem I had especially in mind was that of the artist's dignity."


Expand title description text